Hitachi Eyes 1 TB HDD

by CXOtoday Staff    Apr 06, 2005

Hitachi Global Storage Technologies recently announced new advancements to a 100-year-old magnetic recording technology that Hitachi feels, will set the stage for ultra-high capacities such as a 20 GB Microdrives or 1 TB, 3.5-inch hard drives.

In order to achieve this, the company demonstrated data density at 230 gigabits per square inch (Gb/in2) on perpendicular recording. Hitachi believes 230 Gb/in2 will be implemented in commercial hard drive products in 2007. When fully realized over the next 5-7 years, perpendicular recording could enable a 10-fold increase in data densities over longitudinal recording, paving the way for new heights in capacity such as a 60 GB one-inch drive.

While the hard drive industry has been using longitudinal recording successfully for five decades, it is now within two product generations of reaching its practical limit. Researchers are finding that longitudinal recording is losing its ability to maintain data integrity at areal densities much beyond 120 Gb/in2.

“We are at the cusp of the most significant hard drive technology transition of the past decade, and it’s one that holds so much promise for the hard drive and consumer electronics industries,” said Jun Naruse, CEO, Hitachi Global Storage Technologies.

“As the biggest supplier of small-form-factor hard drives, 2.5-inch and below, consumers’ demand for storing more data on smaller devices has provided a strong impetus for us to pursue perpendicular recording with a greater sense of urgency,” added Naruse.

While the transition to perpendicular recording will start as early as the next product generation, Hitachi feels the true potential will be realized in the 200+ Gb/in2 range — the point of technology maturation when meaningful advancements in storage capacity will ensure full-scale adoption of perpendicular recording technology.

Perpendicular recording has its roots in the late 19th century work of Danish scientist Valdemar Poulsen, who is generally considered the first person to magnetically record sound using perpendicular recording. The technology gets its name from the vertical alignment of data bits on the plane of the disk, which takes less room in contrast to the horizontal orientation of today’s longitudinal recording technology.

To be accurately recorded and read, the more closely-packed perpendicular bits also require a closer association between the read/write head and the recording media. Hitachi achieved the 230 Gb/in2 density by manipulating the head and media so that the distance between them is a mere 10 nanometers or 1/10,000th of a human hair.

Tags: HDD