IBM enters converged infrastructure space with PureSystems

by CXOtoday Staff    Apr 11, 2012

It is the result of $2 billion in R&D and acquisitions over four years, to integrate all IT elements, both physical and virtual, the company says.

IBM today said that it has taken a major step forward in a new, simpler era of computing with the introduction of a new category of expert integrated systems.

These expert integrated systems family, called PureSystems, is the result of $2 billion in R&D and acquisitions over four years, to integrate all IT elements, both physical and virtual, the company said.

“We have integrated our client experiences by design, not just through products, but every aspect of the client relationship now comes in-built. PureSystems integrate hardware and software to instantly power-up your IT infrastructure, having to deal lesser with managing it,” said Alok Ohrie, Director, Systems and Technology Group, IBM India South Asia.

PureSystems is further divided into two groups. One is PureFlex, which is an infrastructure focused system that helps in the integration of servers, storage and networking. The other platform is PureApplication that includes networking capabilities from IBM that helps in the deployment of new types of applications.

“By tightening the connections between hardware and software, and adding incomparable software expertise, PureSystems is designed to help enterprises free up time and money to focus on innovation that many businesses are unable to address due to ever rising costs and staffing needs in the traditional data centre,” said Pradeep Nair, Director, Software Group IBM India/South Asia.

With the launch of PureSystems, IBM is taking on Oracle, HP and Cisco who have been pushing converged infrastructure offerings that combine software and hardware gear in a single unified system.

“We stand out from our others as our systems are ready-to-use. This is unlike the offerings from other players where enterprises have to put their time and energy to figure out how to go about the integration and other such areas,” said Nair.

According to IDC, the prime challenge facing companies worldwide is the need to spend 70 percent or more of IT budgets on simple operations and maintenance, leaving little to invest in innovation.