Microsoft Continues To Invest In Cyber Security

by CXOtoday News Desk    Jan 27, 2017

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The growing concern of complex and disastrous cyber security threats has made IT majors to invest a whopping amount of dollars on safety and security of customers. Microsoft is one such tech titans that said it will continue to sink large chunks of money to battle cyber-attacks over the next several years, as it has pledged to spend over $1 billion every year to protect its users, reports Reuters.

The amount includes research and development to stay ahead of hackers, but it doesn’t include any cash Microsoft might spend on acquisitions in the area of cyber-security.

While the number of attempted cyber attacks was 20,000 a week two or three years ago, that figure had now risen to 600,000-700,000, according to Microsoft data.

Known more for its Windows software, Microsoft has shifted its focus to the cloud stepping in competition with Amazon.com. In October it said quarterly sales from its flagship cloud product Azure, which businesses can use to host their websites, apps or data, rose 116 percent, said the report.

The venture arms of Microsoft invested in Team8, an Israeli cybersecurity start-ups, as big multinational companies get behind Israel’s growing cyber industry given the rising threats.

In addition to its internal security investments, Microsoft has acquired three Israel-based security firms in about two years including, enterprise security startup Aorato, cloud security firm Adallom, and Secure Islands. Their data and file protection technology has been integrated into cloud service Azure Information Protection.

Though Microsoft does not have any near-term plans to implement deception technology, “we look at lots of different technologies that might be of use in the future,” said, Bharat Shah, Microsoft vice president of security, stated the report.

Shah believes that in the next year or so progress should be made in moving toward broader implementation of user authentication without need for a password.